Creative Arts Therapist on Your Dementia Care Team?

Artful Approach, Caregiver's Journey, Dementia Compass

On a Tuesday afternoon, I was going around the halls of an assisted living community inviting people to a program I was about to lead. There was a gentleman there who I always looked forward to saying hi to, knowing quite frequently he would turn down my invitation but enjoyed a brief visit. On this particular afternoon, as I knocked on his door and saw him sitting in his chair, I could see he was waking up from a nap. He looked distressed as I greeted him. The world I walked into that afternoon was that of a battlefield. This man, who had dementia, was reliving his time at war. I could see the trauma in his eyes, the fear in his hands.

At a jewelry store in town, I met a woman whose mother had dementia. Once she learned that I worked with this population she shared moments when her mom would go off into these worlds and she didn’t know what to do. She learned not to fight her mother, but she no longer felt she could connect with her mom whom she loved deeply. She could feel their lives separating.

While leaving a skilled care community I stopped to talk with a family member of a resident who recently passed away after living with dementia for several years. She shared with me no longer knew who she was and struggled to see life without spending each day visiting mom. She feared what daily life would become and the impact this would have on her relationships.

These are common stories one might hear when living with dementia.

We all possess the ability to enter into the world of someone with dementia. We all are able to sit and listen to the stories we share with each other. We all are capable of walking with another person through their struggles. This takes no special skill, no extra training, no letters behind our name. But, what would the impact be like if we invited someone with a little extra training and skills into the picture? What if we invited a Creative Arts Therapist to take a seat on our care team, joining the geriatricians, general practice doctors, elder law attorneys, financial advisors, social workers, pharmacists, nurses, priests or other religious, neurologists, and a selection of family members?

This week is Creative Arts Therapies week. It is a week where all of the fields within the Creative Art Therapies take extra time to promote the work they do in our community and share with us the role they might play in our lives. This includes Music Therapists, Art Therapists, Drama Therapists, Dance/Movement Therapists. They are individuals with special training to combine the already known power of the arts with a skillfully directed therapeutic practice. Their current role in dementia care is often that of Glorified Life Enrichment Specialist, and that may be at times the role they play, but it can be greater than that. They can sit with those who might be reliving a trauma, are struggling with the loss of a husband or their home, a diagnosis. They can support the amazing artist that come into our communities to lead programs based on the visual, performing and written arts. They can show us how to enter the world of our loved ones with dementia. They can aid us in healing during and after our dementia journey. And, they can be the bridge between the medical and non-medical side of caregiving.

Each field within the creative arts therapies can play a special role in our care, for we each have our own connection to one specific art form over another. They can partner with artists, physical therapists, nurses, and doctors to help increase the quality of care and daily living. Frequently I hear concerns about inviting arts therapist into the picture, they say they already have artist providing art therapy yet these individuals frequently are not art therapists, but an artist using the arts in a therapeutic way. (There is a difference that would be a conversation for another time.) Or they feel that the world the of our care communities is already too medicalized and having a creative arts therapist involved would be adding to the medical world. While I agree that we don’t need a creative arts therapist to be able to benefit from the arts and that our care communities lean too far into the medical realm there is still a seat at the table for these specific fields. What a creative arts therapist provides is not more of the same, but something that can partner with programs and with individuals that might need more than the basic elements of the arts. They can add a depth to the care provided. A creative arts therapist can help the families learn how to communicate and transition into this new chapter of the relationship with their loved one, and, once the time has come, help them heal and rediscover their own life once the role of caregiver has been taken away. They can sit with our care community staff and help them navigate their job and minimize the burnout and depression that comes from working with loss day in and day out.

Use the arts with your loved one and for yourself. Find moments of joy, creativity, and satisfaction and growth through the arts, then I invite you to think about the creative arts therapies. Consider opening up a spot on the care team for a Creative Arts Therapist both for your loved one and for yourself. You might be amazed at how they can help you during this time and how we have been limiting the impact they can have on those living with dementia. What has been shared above is just a peek into what is possible.

To learn more about the Creative Arts Therapies and to find a Creative Arts Therapist in your area (credentials to look for):

Drama Therapy   (RDT or RDT-BCT)

Music Therapy  (MT-BC)

Art Therapy   (ATR or ATR-BC)

Dance Therapy    (R-DMT-BC-DMT)



A Bluetiful Life Continued

Artful Approach, Caregiver's Journey

Allison Lazicky from Tom-Notch Teams (the same Allison I did a post for in January about Life is Bluetiful) recently had me on her podcast, Bluetiful…Celebrating Kindness Leaders, produced by the Whole Care Network. It was a first for me, and hopefully the first of many. This podcast is, as the title informs, about Kindness Leaders. What is a Kindness Leader? Allison, through her conversations, answers that question and shows us that they are the very people we spend our day with at work, at home, and in our community. They are the individuals that take their triumphs and trials and use them as a way to transform how they care for others, and by doing so, give us all examples of how to better live in community with each other. Each person shares how they find the bluetiful in everyday life.

During our episode, I speak about TimeSlips and how it has become a launching point to further creativity and relationship development. (I will allow you to listen to the episode to learn more. Follow up questions are encouraged.)

After replaying what was said in my mind a few times, I walked away from this experience wondering, how am I a Kindness Leader? This is not something I label myself as or a role I thought I played. I found myself asking, what is the full depth and width of this role mean to me and the people in my life? What I came up with was this, I see it as another form of being a Beautiful Soul. A beautiful (or bluetiful) soul is one who has gone through the deep trials of life and has come out filled with a light and a spirit far beyond previously imaginable. One that can help guide and inspire others. One that can support and stand with those they love and care for, encouraging beauty and joy, and willing the good of all those they encounter. While I don’t know if I would label myself as a beautiful soul, I would accept the role of Kindness Leader. I have undeniably lived through many things that have hopefully transformed me into becoming a better care partner, a more creative care partner, and someone people know they can come to during triumphs and trials. In my Bluetiful blog post for Allison, and again mentioned in our conversation, I talk about how life is Bluetiful when we are seen and heard for who we truly are and want to become. Individuals that are capable of seeing and hearing this are Kindness Leaders. In my life I have had many kindness leaders guiding me along, standing next to me. Allison is one of them. Thank you, Allison! They have been teachers, parents and grandparents, great aunts and uncles, my brother, classmates, therapists, doctors, fellow employees, peers, church leaders, and dementia care pioneers.

When relating Kindness Leaders to dementia, in order for us to transform the way we think about, look at, and care for those who have dementia we need Kindness Leaders filling positions at every level of care and support. We need the CEOs of our care communities and companies to be Kindness Leaders. We need our charge nurses, care admissions team, medical staff, cleaning staff, activities teams, cooks, and building architects and designers to all be Kindness Leaders. We need individuals who have the wisdom and passion to transform our current care system by having the courage to ask, “What is our ideal care community? What is preventing us from reaching that ideal? What can we do to at least take a step towards that ideal care community?” Kindness Leaders are dreamers and doers. They are individuals who have a better view of the way we care for others than what is currently being exercised. It does not take extensive training or a lot of money. It simply takes a human being who wants the best for fellow human beings.

Thank you, Allison, for having me on your podcast.


To learn more about this podcast and Allison’s work visit the following links:

Top-Notch Teams:

Whole Care Network:

My Blog Post:

My Podcast Episode, Meaningful Life Enrichment in Care Communities Using the Arts:

Changing Our Negative View

Artful Approach, Faith Filled Journey

“If you are primed with negative attitudes about aging it turns out it has an impact on your health and well-being, on your risk of developing dementia, the first level of impact is on what you believe is possible.” -Dr. Bill Thomas

This was a quote from a Facebook Live session that happened a few weeks ago. Dr. Bill Thomas is, as he puts it, “the only living geriatrician on the internet” (which, side note is scary! We need more than 5,000 geriatricians in this country, and that is about how many we have) and he is a wonderful resource for us all. He got me thinking, how can we address this in a productive and impactful way? Of course, my mind went directly to the arts. Through art, we can transform the negative priming into a positive outlook. Through the way we tell stories, paint a picture, cast a play, and accept individuals into our orchestras, we can change the way our communities look at aging. By having those who are “old” participate in the arts and improving the way they are portrayed, we start a dialogue. By creating intergenerational creative projects we can experience first hand the joy, life, and meaning that can occur at all stages of life. If we start to write stories that are more than doom and gloom, we can lift the fear of aging. If we start to write stories that show life and not “living death,” we can see that joy that can be in each breath of life. If we start to write stories that don’t mock but show a full and authentic life, we start to see the reality of life’s progression.

We are starting to see a shift in this portrayal, if only at the moment just a glimmer. If you saw the new Disney movie, Coco that won 2 Academy Awards this past Sunday you might see what I am getting at. Instead of showing aging as something to mock or fear, they showed a beautiful connection between generations, and a moment where music helped connect a young boy to his great-great-grandmother in a powerful way. We need more of this in our movies, books, plays, TV shows, and artwork. This then must trickle down into our media, the news stations, the podcasts, then into our schools, community organizations, and importantly, into our own homes. We sometimes underestimate the power of what we see and hear as we listen to music, watch a movie, or listen to a news program has on how we look at and think about life.

Art can change the perspective, and encourage a change in dialogue, the language we use, and the portrayal of what it truly means to get older. It cannot do it alone though, I will be bold to say we need to also get rid of euthanasia, regardless of what we are telling ourselves, it is not a choice we are meant to have. We never know what we might be robbing ourselves of, or our communities if we support and participate in this act of murder/suicide. You all know I speak form the Catholic lens. So you had to know that this was coming. I do not abandon my faith when I enter into care, my job, my community, or when I leave the church. It is with me always. This may be polarizing, but it is an example of the boldness we need in how we address aging and care, and value of human life.

This post took a turn I didn’t plan on, but we cannot enjoy the light if we avoid the dark. Thank you for courageously reading this post with an open mind and heart. Art can change the negative priming we have about aging. Art can bring light to the darkness of aging. Art can inspire us to find joy. Art can change the way we think, but without the support of difficult moments, it remains unsupported. Therefore, we must be bold, dynamic, and engage in the community on the topic of aging.

Art Takes Us from “What” to “Who”

Artful Approach

There is a question, a seemingly harmless question, that haunts us in childhood, at the start of young adulthood, and at the end of life, “What do you want to be when you grow up?” As an adult, I still get asked this question, and I have found that with older adults it is a question of, “What were you?” This question has never sat well with me, for reasons I never chose to explore. It is a damaging question and one that should be transformed into, “Who do you want to become?” Our careers, our educational endeavors, only one small part of what makes up our lives. It is fleeting, while our values, beliefs, character, and interests are carried with us throughout our life.
It is more the topic of “what” that is a problem than the question itself. As kids we have answers, often times great and big answers to this question. We want to be doctors, artists, lawyers, firemen, construction workers, businessmen. The list is as endless as the dreams we hold. When we are young adults that question of “what” starts to feel like pressure, we have to select a major in college or decide if we are to go to college, into the army, attend a vocational school, or directly into the workforce. As we graduate and move forward into a career we have to balance the dreams we have and the not yet/maybe not of our reality. We may know where we are going, or we may not. We may know what we are doing, or we may not. We may have the golden ticket to our dream job or a door slammed into our face. The question through all of this remains, “What do you do?” This word, this question comes back when we are older, retired, when asked, “What were you?” and “What did you do for a living?”
What. What. What. What. Can we erase that word and replace it with “Who” and ask, “Who are you?” and “Who do you want to become?” For as long as we have breathe, we are becoming. The question of “who” looks at the entirety of a person, it shifts that value of a person from how they make/made their money, to how they live their life. If we are to truly connect with individuals, dementia or not, we need to get into the deep waters of a person’s life. To get behind the “what” of a life, and ask the “who” and “why” of life. I heard in a recent training, “Every time a person has a diagnosis of one form of dementia or another, it is like a library is burning down.” By asking the question of “what” we never are able to explore the books in that library. We are never able to learn from, be inspired by, or be fully connected with them if we fixate not the “what.”
How do we transform the “what” into a “who” when language and memory are slipping? Easy, through the arts and creativity. By playing music, engaging in storytelling, through art explorations and making, by asking, as Anne Basting often encourages, beautiful questions, we push aside the obstacles and reach each person on a deeper level. And in doing so, not only do we become more relational, but we also bring joy and purpose into our relationships and each other’s lives. We should engage in art, engage in creativity, and engage in asking the questions of, “who are you?” and “who do you want to become?” Not just in our encounters with dementia, but also with their caregivers, family members, and with everyone we encounter. Our children should be asked, “Who do you want to become?” Our college students the same question. Our recent graduates, our unemployed, our staff, our recent retirees, and our grandparents. Who do you want to become today? Tomorrow? For the rest of your moments here on earth? Be it through the creation and absorbing of the arts and creativity, or through asking the question.


Personal Library: Start with YES!

Artful Approach, Caregiver's Journey, Dementia Compass

“The culture shift we envision begins with communication and ends with connection,” writes Cathy Braxton and Tami Neumann on page 11 of their book, Start with Yes! A Unique Way to Communicate with Persons Living with Dementia. They are the creators of the DementiaRAW method. In a world (mostly internet world) that is filled with too much information to possibly sort through on the topic of dementia, they get to the heart of what a caregiver needs to form better connections and provide better care. They have shown us how to apply improv and the workings of basic human seeking to dementia. Many of you know that I love working with people who understand theatre because they know how to jump in, jump into the world of the person they are caring for, jump into the flexible roles, and jump into creativity.  This book shows us how to start becoming better caregivers, friends, family members, and neighbors to those living with one of the many diseases that fall under the dementia umbrella by learning how to jump in. It is short enough to be a realistic and practical guide, yet deep enough to actually be resourceful. It is a book all should have in their personal library.

We all long for connection. Connection to each other, to our world, to our own lives. We can develop that connection through communication, and the appropriate form of communication. In the dense and often overly medical and academic (and frequently negative) guides out there, this book is a gem. Thank you, Tami and Cathy!

A Bluetiful Life

Artful Approach

A few weeks ago I was introduced to the founder of Top-Notch Teams, Allison Lazicky, by Mindy Bolton of Playscriptions. During my conversation with Allison, she asked me if I would write a blog post for her site on the topic of, “Life is Bluetiful,” that would join a series she started back in September. When thinking about the topic of “Bluetiful” a play on “Beautiful” my mind spun in a thousand different directions. Life is Bluetiful in so many ways, in the funny, in the serious, in the sad, in the joyful. I was eventually able to slow down the spinning mind, put pen to paper (or rather hands to keys), and wrote the following. I hope you enjoy. I hope it causes you to ask when your life is Bluetiful. Head over to Top-Notch Teams’ website to read the other posts in this series.

My Life is Bluetiful when my crazy, frizzy, curly, auburn hair behaves. My Life is Bluetiful when I have skies of my feet or a racquet in my hand. My Life is Bluetiful both when I have the house to myself and when I am in a home filled with people. My Life is Bluetiful when above 2,000 feet or in the middle of a lake. My Life is Bluetiful when cheese fills my fridge. My Life is Bluetiful when hiding in the garden. My Life if Bluetiful when sitting in front of a fire on a cold winter’s night with family and pup by my side. My Life is Bluetiful when a book is in hand that I refuse to put down. My Life is Bluetiful when I survived a summer’s day without getting burnt. My Life is Bluetiful when I remember the password for my account. My Life is Bluetiful when sleeping with the windows open for the first time in the spring.

I have spent my life seeking the Good, the True, and the Beautiful… um, I mean Bluetiful, and I seek is still.  As I reflect now, all of life is Bluetiful. The messy and the organized. The imperfect moments and the near perfect joys. The anticipation and the arrival.

Life is Bluetiful when a wave of peace washes over us in the middle of a storm. Life is Bluetiful when a wall of sound hits us while at a choir concert, better yet, when we realize we are that wall of sound. Life is Bluetiful when we are allowed to have recess as an adult, to play and laugh so hard our stomach and face hurt for moments long after the silence has returned. Life is Bluetiful when we recognize the gift of a moment while still in the moment. Life is Bluetiful when we are seen and heard for who we are and striving to become. Life is Bluetiful always when we are seeking it, when we are ignoring it, and when we despise it.

A Bluetiful life is one well lived, filled with family, friends, purpose. When sounds of music, laughter, and the voices of those we care for fill our hears and our hearts with joy. When looking at the sky, or the ocean, or in our loved one’s eyes, life is Bluetiful.


You can follow Allison’s work by visiting:

Top-Notch Teams’ Website is

Top-Notch Teams’ Facebook is


As well as Mindy’s work:

Playscriptions’ Website is

Playscriptions’ Facebook is

A Starting List-What To Do?

Artful Approach, Dementia Compass, Personal Story of Dementia

Each time someone learns that I am a Dementia and Creative Engagement Specialist, someone will tell me their personal story of dementia. I will learn their grandma had Lewy Body Dementia, or of their mom having early-onset Alzheimer’s, or their grandfather has Vascular Dementia. Not once have I shared my work without someone sharing with me that they too live/lived with dementia. More and more of us will be impacted by this terminal disease yet our knowledge and the way we care for those with the diagnosis and their care partners are sometimes limiting. As many people there are with dementia, that is how many paths will be experienced. My personal experience with dementia, the bullet point version? My grandma was diagnosed with Vascular Dementia in July of 2005. She lived with the diagnosis of dementia for 6 and a half years. Those years were graced with an excellent doctor, and good care at the nursing home she lived starting in 2008 until her death in 2012. She had a handful of family members that visited her regularly and had a care plan that helped her sustain the best quality of life possible.  This is not always the case.

After sharing with each other our experiences of living with dementia I am often asked what steps should they have taken, what steps should they take now to help improve their lives and the lives of their loved one with dementia? It is next to impossible to come up with a universal list, but regardless of what type of dementia your loved one has, and where they are in the progression of the disease, this list might be a good starting point.

1. Love them as you always have. Caring for them as another human being. Visit them, maybe even with a cup of ice cream!

2. Have patience with them, and yourself, as the disease progresses knowing that the person they are today may not have been the person they were yesterday, or 10 years ago, the person they will be tomorrow. It can be difficult but live in the moment, finding a balance between who they are now, and who they were. Cherish the moments when they are having good days. If they are struggling to find a word, or cannot remember something, don’t rush the conversation, redirecting if needed.  And understand that everything they do, from trying to help someone, to the words they speak, to the yelling is a form of communication.

3. Find a really good doctor if you can! (If you want to become a doctor, or are in school now to become a doctor PLEASE consider going into Geriatrics! Or at a minimum study and work to understand dementia.)

4. Find a support group! These can be in-person groups or an online community.

5. If they are a person a faith, work to make sure that their faith is still being practiced. Pray with them! Take them to Mass/service.

6. Learn what makes each form of dementia unique, learn about what medications, care plans, and support work best for the specific type of dementia your loved one has, and then keep learning.

7. Encourage the places of business you visit to become Purple Angels.

8. Know that dementia does take away, but it also gives. It gives you time to spend with the one you care about in a new way. It allows you to engage with them creativity, to record their story. Don’t allow what they might no longer be able to do, to prevent you from spending time with them, engaging with them in ways that are creative, educational, social, and new.

9. Take care of yourself. Self-care is a trendy thing right now, that doesn’t mean you should fluff it off as you roll your eyes. Take time to mourn the person they once were, and find ways to breathe, find joy in your life, and work through the difficult times. Seeking support when needed, and know that dementia is an improv show. We are all taking what each moment is giving us, and then moving it forward the best we can.

10. Respect them. Don’t yell at them, Don’t ignore them. Even when it is difficult, still visit them, treating them as you would like to be treated.



New Training Programs Offered!

Artful Approach, Dementia Compass, Understanding Dementia, What Is Dementia

I am pleased to announce that I have developed two new training programs that I am introducing this summer. In addition to Understanding Dementia, Facilitation of Teepa Snow’s GEMS, and Dementia at Work, I now will offer, Engage with Dementia, and Young Ambassadors: Dementia Training for School Age Children. Below is a rundown of each training program. If you are interested in offering any of these for your company, organization, school, church, or even your family please feel free to contact me via the Contact page on this website, or email me at

Understanding Dementia: This 45-60 minute training covers the basics of dementia, going over different forms of dementia, current statistics, briefly looking at the cost of dementia, and basic ways to work with individuals with dementia. A resources guide is provided upon completion of the training that will lead you to community and national resources. The training is fitting for any setting or group and is a classroom training. The cost of the training is $75 or Free if you are becoming a Purple Angel, or are a family.

Working with Dementia: This 45-minute training covers the specifics of how to navigate dementia relationships in the workplace, be it through clients, customers, consumers, and visitors. This training is fitting for insurance companies, the remodeling and construction industry, those in the service industry, restaurants, museums, and other places of business, and is a classroom and experiential training. The cost of the training is $50 or Free if you are becoming a Purple Angel, or are a family.

Engage with Dementia: This 2 Session, 60 minute each training covers how to become engaged creatively with dementia, how do we develop meaningful programming for those with dementia, applying creative engagement to any role be it a nurse, activities/Life Enrichment specialist, or CEO, and understanding the balance between extroverted and introverted programming and communication. This training is designed specifically for Care Communities such as Hospitals, Nursing Homes, In-Home Care providers, Assisted Living communities, as well as for museums and those seeking development of intergenerational programming. Upon completion of the training a resource guide is provided along with ongoing mentorship and consulting, and one program developed specially for the site. This is a 2 part classroom and experiential training. The cost of this training is $100.

Young Ambassadors: Dementia Training for School Age Children: This 45-minute training covers the basics of dementia presented in a way suitable for school age children. This training is designed for schools, and children’s programming organizations such as summer camps and after school care and is an experiential training. The cost of this training is $30 or Free for families.

TimeSlips: More than Storytelling

Artful Approach, Dementia Compass, Timeslips Story

By now you have read two TimeSlips stories, but I have mentioned little about what it is and how it is used. TimeSlips, as described by their website, states, “TimeSlips offers an elegantly simple revolution in elder care by infusing creativity into care relationships and systems…TimeSlips provides hope and improves well-being through creativity and meaningful connection.” I have experienced this as a Certified TimeSlips Facilitator. It is by far, one of the most successful and impactful programs I have used in every setting of dementia care.

TimeSlips started in Milwaukee, WI in 1998 by Anne Basting, and has since reached 42 states and 12 countries. It is lead by Certified TimeSlips Facilitators but is also something that family members can lead by using the Creativity Journal. This method is backed by research. Information on that research can be found on their website.

In a very simple way, TimeSlips is a method of creating stories using an image as a prompt. These images often have movement in them and are not of anyone, or any place familiar to the storyteller. This can be expanded and adapted in many different ways. I encourage you to read some of the stories shared on the website. These stories can take the storyteller many places and encourage creativity and joy. Individuals with dementia, often communicate through storytelling and using TimeSlips becomes another form of that communication. It is a way for them to share their lives, and to give to those willing to listen. When I am working with a group or individual to create a story I open it up to all kinds of prompts. Sometimes these prompts may be music, artwork, different smells, sounds, videos, and of course, photos. I make sure there is movement, and at first, does not show their home, or faces of family, friends, or themselves  (I may introduce these elements later, depending on the direction we are taking and the person I am working with at the time). I start by asking a question, “What do you think of this image, dance, smell, sound?” With this single question, a story will blossom, through my asking of other questions and our conversation, the story will grow. By the time 20-30 minutes are up we have a short story that we may expand on week after week, turn into a play, a book, a new art piece, or leave it as a short story. We can share it with others, or keep it to ourselves.

As we are creating the story I mostly ask questions, but at moments I will fill in my own answers. I want this to be their story, but I also want this to be our story. When my job, our job as caregivers, is to become relational with the individual, it is important that we develop ground we can share. They have full input into how each story moves forward, and what we do with the story upon completion. One thing that I always do for the individual or group is to create a book after we have told about 10 stories. I will hand make a book using their stories and ideas as to how the book will look. They are the editors, I am the compiler. With each book, I also create an e-Book and audiobook. This can be done by simply scanning the pages of the book and exporting them into a PDF. Having an e-Book means that all will have access to reading the stories. It allows them to blow it up on a computer or mobile device (yes, many people I work with have iPads, iPhones, or other forms of technology). This PDF from can be easily read. I create the audiobook for the same reason, with an iPad and the GarageBand app (the simplest way to do this), we record the stories, create an intro and a closing, link everything together, and maybe we can add music, different voices, or I can become the voice for the stories. I often do this in short pieces as we go along, playing back the story for them at the conclusion of each time spent together.

The great beauty of this process is that through telling a story, even an imaginative story, our reality seeps into the lines and paragraphs. I have yet to have an experience where upon completion of the story, I don’t learn that a part of the story was something the individual experienced or still experiences. Through these stories, I learn about battles from WWII, farm life in Ohio, what is might be like to lose a child and a husband in one day, about what summers smelled like in Texas in the 1950s, about what it was like to ride on the wings of an airplane, or to be a teacher in rural Wisconsin. I learn about the people that impacted the person’s life, and what they loved about their life, and even about their regrets. This is information I would not have discovered outside of this method. Even with dementia, they can share their life with another. It is beautiful. It is sad. But, aside from the details of the story, it is always joyful, and specifically for me, always informative.

Timeslips is a storytelling method, but it is also a way for us to give to each other, listen to one another, and bring a meaningful moment to another person’s day, week, month, year. It connects people. It is intergenerational. It is creativity at it’s best and highest awe inspiriting moments.



To learn more about TimeSlips, or to become a Certified TimeSlips Facilitator click on the links attached.

A Poem by Norman

Artful Approach, Purple Angels

In preparation for tomorrow’s Lewy Body post, I want to share with you a poem that was written by Norman McNamara who what diagnosed with Lewy Body (Bodies) Dementia at age 50. He is, in addition to the founder of the Purple Angel program, the author of the book, The Lewy Body Soldier

Please do not Mock Us

Do not pity me because i have dementia,
Nor must you mock me because i have lived so long with it,
You would always choose to live well over not doing so, wouldn’t you ?
So why cant i do the same?
Thing is, i have no choice in the matter
I have no idea how i will be on a daily basis,
I cannot make plans for the future
The uncertainty of what the next day brings is unrelenting,
I dont know why i have lived so long with this illness
I dont know why i am still able to do what i do,
But i do the best i can do,, wouldn’t YOU ?
i am sure you would do the same,
My time with my family and friends is precious,
Yes the fear of not knowing hangs over me,
And yet, i carry on, best i can, brave face and all that,
Though I weep when my friends pass away,
Especially those who were diagnosed after me,
The guilt is all consuming and yet, and yet
Here i am, there are you, not that much we can do
Enjoy your lives in the knowledge you are special,
No need to mock me or others who live their lives under this dementia cloud,
We are no different than you, maybe just a little more grateful from day to day

Norrms McNamara