A Starting List-What To Do?

Artful Approach, Dementia Compass, Personal Story of Dementia

Each time someone learns that I am a Dementia and Creative Engagement Specialist, someone will tell me their personal story of dementia. I will learn their grandma had Lewy Body Dementia, or of their mom having early-onset Alzheimer’s, or their grandfather has Vascular Dementia. Not once have I shared my work without someone sharing with me that they too live/lived with dementia. More and more of us will be impacted by this terminal disease yet our knowledge and the way we care for those with the diagnosis and their care partners are sometimes limiting. As many people there are with dementia, that is how many paths will be experienced. My personal experience with dementia, the bullet point version? My grandma was diagnosed with Vascular Dementia in July of 2005. She lived with the diagnosis of dementia for 6 and a half years. Those years were graced with an excellent doctor, and good care at the nursing home she lived starting in 2008 until her death in 2012. She had a handful of family members that visited her regularly and had a care plan that helped her sustain the best quality of life possible.  This is not always the case.

After sharing with each other our experiences of living with dementia I am often asked what steps should they have taken, what steps should they take now to help improve their lives and the lives of their loved one with dementia? It is next to impossible to come up with a universal list, but regardless of what type of dementia your loved one has, and where they are in the progression of the disease, this list might be a good starting point.

1. Love them as you always have. Caring for them as another human being. Visit them, maybe even with a cup of ice cream!

2. Have patience with them, and yourself, as the disease progresses knowing that the person they are today may not have been the person they were yesterday, or 10 years ago, the person they will be tomorrow. It can be difficult but live in the moment, finding a balance between who they are now, and who they were. Cherish the moments when they are having good days. If they are struggling to find a word, or cannot remember something, don’t rush the conversation, redirecting if needed.  And understand that everything they do, from trying to help someone, to the words they speak, to the yelling is a form of communication.

3. Find a really good doctor if you can! (If you want to become a doctor, or are in school now to become a doctor PLEASE consider going into Geriatrics! Or at a minimum study and work to understand dementia.)

4. Find a support group! These can be in-person groups or an online community.

5. If they are a person a faith, work to make sure that their faith is still being practiced. Pray with them! Take them to Mass/service.

6. Learn what makes each form of dementia unique, learn about what medications, care plans, and support work best for the specific type of dementia your loved one has, and then keep learning.

7. Encourage the places of business you visit to become Purple Angels.

8. Know that dementia does take away, but it also gives. It gives you time to spend with the one you care about in a new way. It allows you to engage with them creativity, to record their story. Don’t allow what they might no longer be able to do, to prevent you from spending time with them, engaging with them in ways that are creative, educational, social, and new.

9. Take care of yourself. Self-care is a trendy thing right now, that doesn’t mean you should fluff it off as you roll your eyes. Take time to mourn the person they once were, and find ways to breathe, find joy in your life, and work through the difficult times. Seeking support when needed, and know that dementia is an improv show. We are all taking what each moment is giving us, and then moving it forward the best we can.

10. Respect them. Don’t yell at them, Don’t ignore them. Even when it is difficult, still visit them, treating them as you would like to be treated.